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Corrado Coia profile image Corrado Coia

How creators ruin audience relationships in the first 10 seconds

Think about it. A new person clicks on a video, and the first thing they do is… ignore and not listen to the creator— not a good start.

How creators ruin audience relationships in the first 10 seconds

I see this all the time (and I’m guilty of it).

And it should stop.

🙅 How creators are ruining viewer relationships

Remember the intro from the other email?

“…It’s a beautiful sunny day here in California! This is something everyone needs to know, and I’m so excited to show you. But first, don’t forget to like, comment, and, of course, subscribe for more great tips! I post videos every week. Last week, we talked about…”

Look at the part “don’t forget to like, comment, and, of course, subscribe”

That needs to stop.

It’s ruining the relationship with the viewer.

🤔 Why it’s ruining the relationship

Trust is important, and having viewers listen and believe us is essential.

Think about it. A new person clicks on a video, and the first thing they do is… ignore and not listen to the creator— not a good start.

Creator: “Hi! Like, comment, and subscribe!”

Viewer: “Umm… no?”

Not good.

🎯 Here’s the sweet spot, and how to build a powerful relationship instead

There’s a sweet spot to asking viewers when to like, comment, and subscribe.

It’s a combination of these two factors:

  • Average watch time
  • Moment of revelation

If the average video is 10 minutes long and the average watch time is 5 minutes, asking viewers to subscribe at the 8-minute mark is not the best idea. Although it would target the viewers who stuck around the longest, we’re better off moving the ask before the 5-minute mark.

Then, determine when the best moment of revelation is in that average view duration window. What I mean by that is, when does the viewer get that “ah ha!” or “wow” moment?

Right after that moment is the time to ask.

It changes the viewer from saying...

“Umm… no?”

to

“Wow, thanks. I will yes.”

Much better.

— oh, not only will this start a powerful relationship, it’ll also bring in more subscribers.

Much, much better.

 

Corrado Coia profile image Corrado Coia